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root password

Started by carlo, October 14, 2014, 10:01:45 PM

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carlo

hi all
just wondering:
if i'm not mistaken, for the latest release you're giving root the very same password as user:
can i safely change root password?
you know.. i'm nostalgic

one23

#1
If you are talking about Sparky running as Live CD, you can change the password by typing in console

sudo passwd root

then you'll be asked to create new password.


pavroo

And after hard drive installation:
su
<your-existing-password>

then
passwd
Nothing is easy as it looks. Danielle Steel
Join #sparkylinux.org at irc.libera.chat

way12go

We can change root password. But, I think I read somewhere that changing the user name can bring new problems and, I also think I have posted it here on sparkylinux forum, somewhere.
Success gives birth to success? Failure gives birth to failure? - Sagar Gorijala.

carlo

thank you all
just wanted to change  root password, cause i keep typing the passwd i usually use as root  :-*

just i feared i would have undergone in some strange pkexec/remsu behaviour
cheers

pavroo

#5
remsu simply detects is a live or installed system.
Then it uses gksu or gksudo.
Nothing is easy as it looks. Danielle Steel
Join #sparkylinux.org at irc.libera.chat

carlo


py-thon

A lot of Debian-based installations have an inactive root account. You are not meant to login as root. This is the case with Sparky, too. Or did you have to type two different passwords at installation? I didn't. The password of the first user created is the password for administrative tasks (using sudo or gksudo, see https://wiki.debian.org/Root

I would avoid setting a password for root which you can do with sudo passwd root
I tried that two years ago on LMDE. After giving root its own password you actually have two different passwords (root's password and your password as an administrator). As the window which asks for the password (when starting synaptic, setting a new network connection, etc.) doesn't give a hint which of the two passwords is needed for the occasion, you type the wrong password half the time. This is really annoying. I ended up giving root my user password (basically like before, but technically you - unlike before - have two different, but identical passwords which both can and have to be changed individually).
Tower and Notebook: Sparky 64bit MATE

carlo

Quote from: py-thon on October 15, 2014, 05:09:56 PM
A lot of Debian-based installations have an inactive root account. You are not meant to login as root. ....
I thought it was ubuntu's case only
odd thing is that by default on debian user is not a sudoer...

Quote from: py-thon on October 15, 2014, 05:09:56 PM
I would avoid setting a password for root .....you type the wrong password half the time. This is really annoying. I ended up giving root my user password (basically like before, but technically you - unlike before - have two different, but identical passwords which both can and have to be changed individually).
that's what i thought

carlo

i think iv'e found a way out:
in order to keep root and user password different without much pain you have to launch the text installer  8)
cheers

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